Welcome to Faithology Religion Forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. This message will be removed once you have signed in.
Login to Account Create an Account
Photo

As A Christian Parent, What Should We Tell Our Children About Santa Claus?


  • Please log in to reply
70 replies to this topic

#1
joeldgreat

joeldgreat

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 625 posts
Just to give you an introduction, Santa Claus is a mythical figure, based on the great Christian man named Saint Nicholas of Myra. He lived in the 4th century AD. Born in a wealthy Christian parents which left him huge inheritance when they died. He become a priest at a young age as was well-known for his compassion and generosity. He also had a reputation of giving gifts anonymously and he often throw bags of money into people's home (which sometimes down their chimneys) and under the cover of the night to avoid being spotted.

When he died (on December 6 around 340 or 350 AD), the day become an annual feast in which children would put out food for Nicholas and straw for his donkey.

This is only one version of his story and the rest becomes a tradition in which the jolly, red-suited gift giver that we now know as Santa Claus.

Though I may have my own views about Santa Claus, I would like to know you guys of what do you think a Christian parents should tell the children about Santa Claus?

#2
maddie

maddie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 652 posts
To answer your question - yes.
Tell them that Santa was a great man who practiced Christian virtues and shared what he had with those who did not have much.
I believe we need to get Santa out of Christmas. Children forget that we are celebrating the greatest gift, our salvation, on this day.
The commercialism of this world has rubbed off on to our children and all that they can think of is the gift which they would be getting on Christmas day.
In some families Santa has become the center of Christmas celebrations. Selfishness and the need to have more possessions are slowly implanted into children's lives.
Christ seems to have faded into the background. Bring Christ to the fore. Teach Children to be like Christ, giving, sharing, loving. That according to me should be the message of Christmas - not the Santa of today.

#3
thresholdofreality

thresholdofreality

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 94 posts
Introduce the concept of Santa and Christmas, but make sure to tell your children that Santa's sharing and generosity is not limited to only Christmas - tell them that the spirit of giving is for every day of the year. Encourage them to enjoy giving, but do still have them enjoy receiving gifts as well. They are only kids, after all.

#4
Sandra Piddock

Sandra Piddock

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 664 posts
  • LocationSpain
I think allowing kids the myth of Santa Claus for the first few years of their life is perfectly fine, as long as it is not the full focus of Christmas. They should also be told the Nativity Story, which is a lovely way to introduce kids to Jesus and His teachings. When they grow out of their belief in Santa Claus, that's the time to tell them the story of St Nicholas, because then they will know where the tradition came from, and it's another lovely story to encourage them to be generous of spirit, just as he was. If they happen to feel slightly cheated that their parents fibbed to them about a non-existent Santa, at least they know the basis on which the myth was built.
Want to read what I write about? Go to http://http://www.he...om/users/303964 My Helium Home Page

#5
ongoing

ongoing

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 606 posts
I think the whole Santa thing is incredibly evil, and not because of religion.

It completely traumatized me as a child. When I found out that Santa wasn't real, I cried for HOURS. I was...absolutely furious and incredibly hurt that my parents had flat out lied to me. It traumatized me so bad that I had the anger come up in therapy years later (then again, I was angry at my parents about something deeper than that also). It just hurt. It seems silly now, but I honestly feel some of that hurt even just typing this out right now. I was a really sensitive kid and that was the first time in my life that I discovered my parents hadn't been honest with me. They never presented it as if it were a game or make believe or anything. As a younger child I 100% believed in Santa, just as I 100% believed anything else my parents told me.

I don't have kids but I've decided I would never do that to them. If I ever have children and we decide to celebrate Christmas with them I would make sure to let them know that Santa is just a game parents play with their kids.

#6
unarmedthinker

unarmedthinker

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 897 posts

I think the whole Santa thing is incredibly evil, and not because of religion.

It completely traumatized me as a child. When I found out that Santa wasn't real, I cried for HOURS. I was...absolutely furious and incredibly hurt that my parents had flat out lied to me. It traumatized me so bad that I had the anger come up in therapy years later (then again, I was angry at my parents about something deeper than that also). It just hurt. It seems silly now, but I honestly feel some of that hurt even just typing this out right now. I was a really sensitive kid and that was the first time in my life that I discovered my parents hadn't been honest with me. They never presented it as if it were a game or make believe or anything. As a younger child I 100% believed in Santa, just as I 100% believed anything else my parents told me.

I don't have kids but I've decided I would never do that to them. If I ever have children and we decide to celebrate Christmas with them I would make sure to let them know that Santa is just a game parents play with their kids.


Most kids are not traumatized when they realise Santa Claus is not real. I think the majority of people simply grow up and realise on their own accord.

I think your opinion on this is biased by your bad experience. I loved the excitement of the whole Santa thing, it is a magical time for children.

What should Christian parents tell their children? The same as any other parent. Why should they be any different? I don't think Christian parents should try to influence their kids with religion at all.

#7
Jatelo2

Jatelo2

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 429 posts
As a Christian parent you should endeavor to teach your children thing of great spiritual importance and not religious myths such as Santa Clause or any other for that matter. Instruct them to read the scriptures and learn from its doctrine. It is as simple as such!

Read an objective article on christian fastting and more about radical muslems at topratedtips (dot) com.


#8
tommymac

tommymac

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 955 posts
I never subscribed my children to the myth of Santa Claus. I felt that doing so would be akin to lying and I didn't want to do that. I brought them up to know that one of the reasons why we give presents at Christmas is because of the spirit of giving in the myth of Santa Claus. Also, if any fat man is going to get the credit for giving out presents at Christmas, it's going to be me.

#9
niceness8000

niceness8000

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 147 posts
For what Santa Clause has become in today's society, I don't think it's wrong - other than the kid's disappointment when he or she finds out there is no Santa Clause. I don't believe that the modern tradition of Santa holds any sinister meanings that should be withheld.

#10
R. Paradon

R. Paradon

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 725 posts
  • LocationThailand

As a Christian parent you should endeavor to teach your children thing of great spiritual importance and not religious myths such as Santa Clause or any other for that matter. Instruct them to read the scriptures and learn from its doctrine. It is as simple as such!


Jatelo, of course a parent - Christian or not - should teach their children spiritual things, but Santa Clause is just part of a child's fantasy world and is fun. I don't think that any parent is teaching their child to worship Santa Clause. Tell me please, when you were a child did Santa Clause visit you? If so, did it do any harm?
If I make one person smile or feel better every day then I have done my job as a human.

#11
amandaf1977

amandaf1977

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33 posts
When my oldest daughter asked me if Santa was real or not, I responded to her like this, " There is no fat man that comes down the chimney bringing a lot of presents to you. However, if you sit back and think about how many blessings we have all year long, and especially at Christmas, you will know that there is a Santa. He watches over us al year long to make sure we don't have to do without anything." This answer seemed to satisfy her, but we never put a strong emphasis on Santa to begin with. We have always celebrated Christmas as a day to celebrate Christ. Every year since we had that discussion, she chooses to go and pick a name from an angel tree instead of getting "Santa" presents for herself. She says the joy of being a Santa is much better than any gift she can receive. She is now 16. I don't think it ever occured to her to get angry about having been lied to the first several years of her life.

#12
blossom

blossom

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 123 posts
I'm all for telling children upfront that Santa Claus is a fictitous character. If you tell them he's real and then they find out later that he's not, then when you tell them about God, they might potentially wonder if you're also lying about Him being real. Plus, I want my children to understand the true meaning of Christmas. I will probably still buy them gifts, but they will understand that we are celebrating Jesus' birth and we're going to celebrate him by giving to those less fortunate than us.

#13
anniep1978

anniep1978

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts
I think telling our children about the real St.Nick is fine and good but to tell them about the Santa that most people think about these days is not good and beneficial to our children and our Christian values.

#14
tommymac

tommymac

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 955 posts
Doesn't the Santa Claus concept seem rather odd anyway? If you want to be rewarded with material objects, you'd better be good, because someone is watching you. Isn't it better to encourage good behavior as its own reward?

#15
ACSAPA

ACSAPA

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 633 posts
  • LocationMiami, FL
My kid stopped believing in Santa when she was 4 or 5 anyway because she saw me wrapping gifts late at night when I thought she was asleep. She found me out, she let me know I was busted and we never brought it up again. I'm a single mom. My daughter knows I buy the gifts. She comes directly to me when she wants something. She's 14 now, so it's been 9 or 10 years since she believed in Santa. It didn't traumatize her to learn that I buy the gifts.

#16
Esperahol

Esperahol

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 703 posts
  • LocationRight Behind You

Doesn't the Santa Claus concept seem rather odd anyway? If you want to be rewarded with material objects, you'd better be good, because someone is watching you. Isn't it better to encourage good behavior as its own reward?


Is it really much different then telling people that if they pirate software online or don't follow all the rules at work or while driving then the survelliance cameras, drones, stoplight cameras, and internet watchers will take them to jail? Really, Santa is just preparing 1st world children for a lifetime of being on tape or record somewhere in the world. So it isn't a problem really. Besides which like dogs good behavior is something trained into a person, it is not innate - if not rewarded for the use of it as a child why will it be forthcoming as an adult?

#17
mykall

mykall

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 42 posts
I don't support teaching your kida about Santa Clus to the point where he becomes christmas. I think really young kids deserve a sence of innocence or "ignorance" for a period in there life where they can believe in fairytails, tooth fairy and that stuff. But it is important that he or she knows the true meaning behind the celebration of christmas.
I also think that Christians should be able to let their kids know what the world is like, but not forcing your beliefs upon them. Show them the right way to go and I can assure you that they will reach the right destination.

#18
dashboardc33

dashboardc33

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 183 posts
I grew up in a Christian household, and still practice the Christian religion today. I have always celebrated Christmas with a Santa Claus and will continue that tradition with my kids as well. We just always make sure that we put God first and let our kids know that this day is to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ. I think using Santa to celebrate Christmas is a fun idea and I do not think it is a terrible thing to do as Christians as long as we teach our kids to know that Jesus is the reason for the season.

#19
ChristiQ

ChristiQ

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
In our home, we teach the kids about Saint Nick (a.k.a Santa). We teach them about the real person who gave gifts to show God's love for us and to celebrate the true gift of Christmas, Jesus. We focus our decorations more on the birth of Christ instead of Santa decorations. If my kids ask me if Santa is real, I tell them that he was real and remind them of the story of St. Nick. I tell them that people like to pretend to be Santa because it's so much fun to share God's love with people. It's usually not until they are in school that they begin to wonder if Santa is real, and by then, they are ready to understand.

#20
nash22

nash22

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 130 posts
It's tradition for kids to think Santa Claus is real. I will do the same for my kids, until they grow out of it.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users