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Why Easter Is Celebrated?

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#1
taskeinc

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I'm about to open a large can of worms, but here goes. Why do most Americans celebrate, honor, and respect Easter?

 

Is it simply a tradition? Is it ritualistic? Is it the Christian thing to do? And why is it so commercialized today? There are Easter sales, Easter baskets, lies about an Easter Bunny, people who never go to church, for some reason, feel they have to go on Easter Sunday. Then there are the Easter outfits. A man has to wear a new suit, a woman has to have a new dress.

 

Let's touch on what Easter, or the Passover, is all about.

 

"The Passover," was supposedly the tenth plague, brought on the people of Egypt.

Exodus 11:1-12..

"About midnight I will go throughout Egypt." "Every firstborn in Egypt will die, from the firstborn son of Pharaoh, who sits on the throne, to the firstborn of the slave girl, who is at her hand mill, and all the firstborn of the cattle as well."

 

The Israelites were instructed to mark the doorposts of their homes with the blood of a spring lamb and, upon seeing this, the spirit of the Lord knew to pass over the first-borns in these homes, hence the name of the holiday.

 

A 10-year-old would question why a loving entity would kill all first born children, including the firstborn of the "slave girl," when this person or family would be guilty of NOTHING. A 10-year-old would also make the observation that, if I'm a parent one day, I'm pretty sure I would not want my firstborn child murdered simply because I was not an Israelite, or not Christian, or because I didn't smear lamb's blood over my door.

 

So why would anyone celebrate, if it were true, such a catastrophic, murderous event? If this 10th plague (or 1-9 for that matter) were true, would it not make the Christian/Muslim God a murderer? A Jim Jones-type, guilty of mass infanticide?


AmazingUniverse.info


#2
pafjlh

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Easter is the day to acknowledge the resurrection of Christ.  Its stated in the scriptures that he was crucified died and was buried. On the third day he rose again, Easter is the day to celebrate the resurrection.  As for the Easter Bunny, the Eater baskets, Easter outfits, I guess along the way like Christmas, this holiday also got commercialized.  Yes, this celebration does come around the same time as pass over, and I can't explain to you why pass over is celebrated other then it is considered a historic event in its religion as well.



#3
Libragirl67

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I do know as a Christian that Easter should be celebrated as the ressurection of Jesus Christ. I was brought up in a Catholic home but even under those circumstances, the Easter bunny prevailed. My brother and I would wake up to baskets full of candies and treats left ofcoarse by the Easter bunny. As we were catholic though, we always attended Easter Sunday service. And yes we all got dressed up.My dad would even buy my mom and I wrist corsages every Easter. I think for alot of people Easter is so signifigant because Jesus came back from the dead. This holiday is almost as reveared as Christmas Day.

 

Where the whole Easter bunny concept came in, I do not know. But just as my parents did, in our home we celebrate the ressurection of Jesus Christ. But my kids can always expect that traditional Easter basket as well.



#4
taskeinc

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It is pointed out by some that Easter, as it is celebrated today, is related with the Hebrew tradition, the Jewish Passover. The Jewish Passover under Moses, commemorates Israels deliverance from 300 years of bondage in Egypt.

The word Easter is derived from Eostre, a Teutonic goddess of spring and fertility. According to St. Bede, an English historian of the early 8th century, Easter owes its origin to the old Teutonic mythology derived from the name Eostre, the Anglo-Saxon goddess of spring, to whom the month of April was dedicated. The festival of Eostre was celebrated at the vernal equinox.

Cultural historians find, in the celebration of Easter, a convergence of three traditions - Pagan, Hebrew and Christian.

Emperor Constantine called the Council of Nicaea in 325 AD. One of the main concerns was the date of Easter. The council decided that Easter should fall on Sunday following the first full moon after the vernal equinox. The Alexandrians, noted for their knowledge in astronomical calculations, decided that March 21st would be the perfect date for spring equinox.

It's all a part of "The Greatest Story Ever Told."


AmazingUniverse.info


#5
MTHart

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I kind of wondered a little bit about the whole Easter and Christianity thing. I knew it had to do with supposedly Jesus returning to life (as far as I was told) but I'm not Christian. So really, your post was kind of more of an eye opener for me.

 

I was raised with the Pagan version and a few different traditions. For example, I was taught to refer to it as Eostre or Ostara. The goddess I was taught to praise was Ostara, however I have seen people worshiping Freya around this time since she is also represented by fertility and rabbits. The version of the myth behind Ostara the goddess of spring and fertility (although she is also known as Eostre) was she was late bringing spring one season. Because of her error a young bird died. Ostara felt guilty and remorseful and brought the bird back as a rabbit. However, she forgot to remove it's ability to lay eggs. At least, that last part is the version I was taught as a child.

My family's altars usually carried a specially dyed egg, rabbit figurines, and beautiful flowers to welcome in the new season. 

 

I know in Germany young kids go out and build nests or set out baskets which are usually filled by the parents when the child is distracted or asleep.

 

Now it seems to be more about chocolate and selling toys than anything. I like to think of it as a springtime Christmas commercially.



#6
sherwin07

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Two of the greatest things about Jesus is his death and then his resurrection into heaven. Easter is a time of celebration of the resurrection of Jesus just the same way we on earth celebrate the birthday of a person or the anniversary of a marriage. The marriage took place years ago but we still celebrate the anniversary of it so what is wrong with celebrating easter.

 

One has to understand what the resurrection of Jesus really means then they will appreciate celebrating easter. For christians Jesus' resurrection is symbolic of what is to happen when Jesus returns for his people. 1 Thessalonians 4:16-17 .... For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first: Then we which are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord.

 

We celebrate easter knowing that by his death and resuurection, so shall we have the same experience when he returns. Now that is something to celebrate.



#7
Etu Malku

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You do know that the Lord of Air is Lucifer? I'm just sayin'

 

to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord


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#8
brokenblade

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The first thing I heard about Easter is the bunny of course. But yeah, Christians should think about the resurrection of Christ when celebrating Easter. 



#9
taskeinc

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"For Christians Jesus' resurrection is symbolic of what is to happen when Jesus returns for his people. 1 Thessalonians 4:16-17 .... For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first: Then we which are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord."

----------

 

I hate to tell you Sherwin, you've been brainwashed. Like millions of others who do not read, you're only reciting what's in a 2000-year-old book that is filled with parables, metaphors, anthropomorphism, and myriad other types of apocryphal and dubious literature.

 

According to Saint Paul himself, in his letters, the first prediction of the return of Jesus was supposed to be at a time when, "we also are still alive." In other words, Jesus was to return during the lifetime of Saint Paul. It didn't happen then, and it won't happen now. If you were to live to be 5000 years old, you would still be waiting on Jesus to return.

 

I'm sure you're an intelligent guy, Sherwin, and if that is true, you need to start reading and studying geology (there are rocks across the globe that are billions of years old; rocks that makeup the foundation of the Earth - and the bible suggest that Earth and the Universe is less than 10,000 years old); study astronomy, science, and read about the discoveries of Nicholas Copernicus, Galileo Galilei, Edwin Hubble and the Hubble Telescope, and other great scientist, astrophysicist, microbiologist, astronomers, and mathematicians.

 

The more you investigate and study for yourself, you'll stop believing those outlandish medieval fairy tales. Remember, the authors of the bible thought the world was flat, thought the Earth was the center of the universe, had no knowledge of dinosaurs, had no knowledge of Earth's Neogene Period (which took place about 23 million years ago). The authors of the bible do not mention the fact that the Earth formed 4.5  billion years ago, and that humans have walked the Earth for 190,000 years. According to various "holy books," including the bible, Adam and Eve, and "God creating the universe in 7 days" (for crying out loud), took place around 4004 BC .. if this were true, planet Earth would be approximately 6,017 years old. The creation of the universe has took place over 14 billion years and the fact that we live in an ever-expanding, infinite universe, it's still in the creation faze. There are new stars born every single day, which would account for the fact that there are more stars in the universe than there are grains of sand on every beach in the world.

 

I don't mention all these things to appear to be a know-it-all, or to belittle those who believe the stories told to them when they were children. When we were kids, we were told stories about the tooth fairy (some parents would place money under a child's pillow and that money was supposed to be from the tooth fairy). We were told that a fat white man came down the chimney to deliver Christmas presents (if you have no chimney then he came through the door). My parents would even go so far as to leave 3 cups and saucer's on the table, the third cup was the one "Santa used." We were told stories about the Easter Bunny. Last, but not least, we were told miraculous stories about Jesus. It didn't take long to figure out that the tooth fairy was a lie, the Easter Bunny was a lie, and Santa was a lie. Because the story of Jesus was tied into an eternal damnation, or an eternal bliss, you were forced to believe the Jesus myth. Unfortunately, it will take most people an entire lifetime to realize that the Jesus story, was, [once again] "The Greatest Story Ever Told."

 

PLEASE WAKE UP !

I consistently try to bring out the facts, and implore people to READ, to STUDY, to open your eyes, open your mind, and to understand that, as far as religion (specifically Christianity and Islam) is concerned, you have been duped.


AmazingUniverse.info


#10
claudine

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This is interesting. In my family, we never talked about Easter. When I was a child, I had no idea why we celebrate it. It was a day when I was forced to go to my grandmother and we had to go to a church and the mass was longer than usual and there were more people inside the church. This is all that I remember. Oh, and we were getting gifts - it was always the best part.


Whenever people agree with me, I always feel I must be wrong.
Oscar Wilde
 


#11
SkinTight

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Prior to A.D. 325, Easter was variously celebrated on different days of the week, including Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. In that year, the Council of Nicaea was convened by emperor Constantine. It issued the Easter Rule which states that Easter shall be celebrated on the first Sunday that occurs after the first full moon on or after the vernal equinox. However, a caveat must be introduced here. The "full moon" in the rule is the ecclesiastical full moon, which is defined as the fourteenth day of a tabular lunation, where day 1 corresponds to the ecclesiastical New Moon. It does not always occur on the same date as the astronomical full moon. The ecclesiastical "vernal equinox" is always on March 21. Therefore, Easter must be celebrated on a Sunday between the dates of March 22 and April 25.



#12
Etu Malku

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Prior to A.D. 325, Easter was variously celebrated on different days of the week, including Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. In that year, the Council of Nicaea was convened by emperor Constantine. It issued the Easter Rule which states that Easter shall be celebrated on the first Sunday that occurs after the first full moon on or after the vernal equinox. However, a caveat must be introduced here. The "full moon" in the rule is the ecclesiastical full moon, which is defined as the fourteenth day of a tabular lunation, where day 1 corresponds to the ecclesiastical New Moon. It does not always occur on the same date as the astronomical full moon. The ecclesiastical "vernal equinox" is always on March 21. Therefore, Easter must be celebrated on a Sunday between the dates of March 22 and April 25.

==================================

 

Right . . . and prior to that, Easter was Ostara . . . celebrated for thousands of years by the World's True religions


Etu Malku IIIĀ° MHD

Herald of the Dawn


#13
jhonny2x

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I do know as a Christian that Easter should be celebrated as the ressurection of Jesus Christ.



#14
MercyL

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It is pointed out by some that Easter, as it is celebrated today, is related with the Hebrew tradition, the Jewish Passover. The Jewish Passover under Moses, commemorates Israels deliverance from 300 years of bondage in Egypt.

The word Easter is derived from Eostre, a Teutonic goddess of spring and fertility. According to St. Bede, an English historian of the early 8th century, Easter owes its origin to the old Teutonic mythology derived from the name Eostre, the Anglo-Saxon goddess of spring, to whom the month of April was dedicated. The festival of Eostre was celebrated at the vernal equinox.

Cultural historians find, in the celebration of Easter, a convergence of three traditions - Pagan, Hebrew and Christian.

Emperor Constantine called the Council of Nicaea in 325 AD. One of the main concerns was the date of Easter. The council decided that Easter should fall on Sunday following the first full moon after the vernal equinox. The Alexandrians, noted for their knowledge in astronomical calculations, decided that March 21st would be the perfect date for spring equinox.

It's all a part of "The Greatest Story Ever Told."

 

Ostara/Eostre are fertility/crop celebrations recognizing the earth's transition from winter fallow to the growing season...from the "dead of winter" to the rebirth of spring.

 

Christianity positioned its holidays to surplant the pagan fertility celebrations and created the resurrection to neatly fit over and around the concepts embraced at Ostara. Just lke the child that cries "I can do that, too" when competitng for adult attention, Christians knew that they had to embrace aspects of pagan belief to effectively end the celebratory practices of the Old Religion.


Language is the fabric of reality.


#15
cnfisher1

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Easter is celebrated as the resurrection of Jesus Christ. It symbolizes the day that he was resurrected. In my opinion if you are a Christian like I am, then you realize how important that this holiday actually is .

#16
artistry

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I do not celebrate Easter, as the premise that Christ was slain on Friday and rose on Sunday, called Easter is a flawed one. If you read the Bible, it says He took three days and three nights before He rose. Count the days and nights from Friday to Sunday, it does not work, He would have had to die on Thursday to add up, it does not. Therefore, no celebration for me.  I know He died and rose, just not when they say He did.



#17
vpresson

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I'm about to open a large can of worms, but here goes. Why do most Americans celebrate, honor, and respect Easter?

 

Is it simply a tradition? Is it ritualistic? Is it the Christian thing to do? And why is it so commercialized today? There are Easter sales, Easter baskets, lies about an Easter Bunny, people who never go to church, for some reason, feel they have to go on Easter Sunday. Then there are the Easter outfits. A man has to wear a new suit, a woman has to have a new dress.

 

Let's touch on what Easter, or the Passover, is all about.

 

"The Passover," was supposedly the tenth plague, brought on the people of Egypt.

Exodus 11:1-12..

"About midnight I will go throughout Egypt." "Every firstborn in Egypt will die, from the firstborn son of Pharaoh, who sits on the throne, to the firstborn of the slave girl, who is at her hand mill, and all the firstborn of the cattle as well."

 

The Israelites were instructed to mark the doorposts of their homes with the blood of a spring lamb and, upon seeing this, the spirit of the Lord knew to pass over the first-borns in these homes, hence the name of the holiday.

 

A 10-year-old would question why a loving entity would kill all first born children, including the firstborn of the "slave girl," when this person or family would be guilty of NOTHING. A 10-year-old would also make the observation that, if I'm a parent one day, I'm pretty sure I would not want my firstborn child murdered simply because I was not an Israelite, or not Christian, or because I didn't smear lamb's blood over my door.

 

So why would anyone celebrate, if it were true, such a catastrophic, murderous event? If this 10th plague (or 1-9 for that matter) were true, would it not make the Christian/Muslim God a murderer? A Jim Jones-type, guilty of mass infanticide?

 

 

I never knew that, that was the reason for pass over wow



#18
FaithsShadow

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For Christians, Easter is celebrated because it is one of the fundamental beliefs that the Church was built on. If Jesus didn't rise from the dead, then all his other teachings would have come to nothing. He wouldn't have been able to appear to his apostles and they would not have been able to build the first Christian communities... and there would be no Christianity.

 

It is one pivotal event that helped shape the Church into what it is today. I can't deny that Christianity has many influences from other Religions and that many of the things taught are flawed. People need to be educated on the differences between Religion and Spirituality.

 

Easter is celebrated for many reasons depending on what Religion you belong to. Whatever your reasons, let us respect each other's interpretations and beliefs... and let's give people a chance to grow in wisdom and strength at their own pace. :)



#19
difrancprod

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This is yet another pagan belief "Christianized" by Constantine. Actually, I don't get why people would want to celebrate it when it's so boring! I'm a Christian and this definitely one of the holidays that I hate.







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